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Small Voluntary Organisations’ adoption and use of tech: Phase Two

The purpose of a second phase of this research is to enhance and improve support and funding practices for the use of tech by small voluntary organisations (SVOs). In partnership with CAST, this follow-up piece of work will build on Start Somewhere. We are researching the key moments in the process of adoption and use of tech within SVOs.

 

Covid-19 has accelerated the need and necessity for voluntary organisations of all sizes to engage with tech. CAST and IVAR are hosting a series of digital support sessions with SVOs. These peer-to-peer learning sessions aim to support, reassure and inspire individuals within SVOs. We will gather ideas and stories of how SVOs are responding to change and practical examples of how they are embracing digital. We are interested in how SVOs’ adoption and use of tech has progressed in light of Covid-19, and we are hoping to learn about emergency responses that have specifically encompassed tech, as well as what’s helped or hindered progress in relation to external support and funding.

 

We will also be hosting separate sessions with digital support providers and funders. These sessions will explore:

 

  • What has the current situation taught us about the needs of SVOs with regards to digital support?

     

  • In what ways has the digital ecosystem responded and evolved?

     

  • What does it tell us about the kind of digital support the sector will need in six months/ 1 year’s time?

     

  • What are the implications for funding tech?

     

  • What elements of this support can be transferred to non-emergency settings (e.g. funder activity and behaviour that may have led to new tech initiatives within funded organisations)?

     

IVAR and CAST with develop collective messages for SVOs and funders about the current state of the digital ecosystem and longer term recovery.

If you have any questions or for further information please contact annie@ivar.org.uk.

Trust, power and collaboration: Funding relationships

Newcastle Business School (part of the University of Northumbria) is drawing together case studies on the way people and organisations are approaching better ways to understand local commissioning processes and manage performance. Complexity-informed practice looks at different forms of accountability and has a focus on building a healthy system, developing trust and relationships, joint learning and capturing the effects on users of services.

IVAR has been funded by Tudor Trust to support and add value to this research by extending its scope to include a specific focus on Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) organisations. The overarching aim of this additional work is to consider the implications and requirements (e.g. skills and relationships) of new and different approaches to commissioning for VCS organisations. We will facilitate a series of conversations with VCS organisations, which we expect to focus on the themes of trust, power and collaboration.

This will contribute to a more complete picture of what is needed to ensure systems work for the people they are designed to serve, both locally and nationally.