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Barriers are coming down

Recognising the tremendous pressure that health, VCSE and local authority leaders are under as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak, IVAR and SEUK are facilitating online peer support groups through their Practice Development Network (PDN), which supports cross-sector partnership working in healthcare settings. The aim is to create a space for people to share challenges, opportunities, dilemmas and worries around cross-sector working, and to learn from each other’s experiences. 

This briefing shares the experiences of the 37 people who participated in the first session on 22 April.

A balancing act: Youth volunteering in hospitals, in the context of Covid-19

IVAR is the ‘learning partner’ for the Pears Foundation’s #iwill Match Fund, which supports the growth of inclusive, high-quality youth social action opportunities through 30 NHS Trusts and their respective charities. This briefing offers some initial reflections on the network’s response to Covid-19.

 

‘It has been an incredibly moving experience seeing how young people have responded, adapted and grown in this unfamiliar world we are currently in.’

 

We summarise the main content of peer support sessions for hospital volunteer coordinators which took place, and share insights from the Pears Foundation on each Trust’s response to Covid-19 along with thoughts from #iwill ambassadors and NHS England and NHS Improvement.

 

Alongside this briefing, we are publishing resources to support young volunteer programmes in hospitals, developed and shared by the Pears #iwill Peers. These can be accessed at www.ivar.org.uk/youth-volunteering-in-hospitals

 

Getting ready for the fallout

This third briefing shares the experiences of 37 charities shared between 9 and 16 April 2020, and our reflections on the questions and opportunities for funders that they raise.

Three weeks into the Covid-19 lockdown, VCSE leaders are feeling unsettled. Although the initial phase of manic adjustment has passed, they face the challenges of uncertainty over how long the lockdown will last and what will happen when it ends. Under significant strain, some leaders are beginning to feel exhausted: ‘At times, it can seem like too much’. Thinking about the future, they are increasingly concerned about the long-term fall-out from Covid-19, fearful of the impact of an economic recession and about how public attitudes and long-term public policy might be affected.


Read the full series of briefings here

Moving out of the initial shock

Recognising the tremendous pressure that charity leaders are under as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak, we are facilitating online peer support groups for leaders of voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) organisations. The aim is to create a space for them to share challenges, dilemmas and worries, and to learn from each other’s experiences. Participation in the first sessions was primarily by organisations with a turnover of £1 million or less.

Part of our offer is to feedback to funders the kinds of challenges smaller VCSE organisations are facing, and the help they need. This second briefing shares the experiences of 32 leaders participating in the sessions, and our reflections on the questions and opportunities for funders that they raise. Further briefings will follow as new groups meet.

The pressures of uncertainty

Recognising the tremendous pressure that charity leaders are under as a result of the Covid-19 outbreak, IVAR is facilitating online peer support groups for leaders of voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) organisations. The aim is to create a space for them to share challenges, dilemmas and worries, and to learn from each other’s experiences. Participation in the first sessions was primarily by organisations with a turnover of £1 million or less.

 

Part of our offer is to feedback to funders the kinds of challenges smaller VCSE organisations are facing, and the help they need. This briefing shares the experiences of the first 23 leaders participating in the sessions, and our reflections on the questions and opportunities for funders that they raise. Further briefings will follow as new groups meet.

‘Lived experience’ in grant-making practice

IVAR are the Learning Coordinators for Comic Relief’s UK Intermediary Funders initiative that supports grassroots, community-based grant-making in each of the four home nations. Key aspects of this initiative are to encourage the centrality of lived experience and community-led approaches both in the grant-making process and the grants themselves.

 

This paper looks at what ‘lived experience’ within grant-making practice means for four intermediary funders working with Comic Relief. In light of the Covid-19 crisis, it feels more important than ever to open lines of communication between funders and communities.

 

The Community Foundation for Northern Ireland, Corra Foundation in Scotland, Wales Council for Voluntary Action and Groundwork in England are all rooted in their communities and are well placed to understand the specific challenges and opportunities facing local grassroots organisations. They also recognise the often overlooked expertise and knowledge that sits within communities and local organisations and have all been exploring different ways of integrating ‘lived experience’ into their grant making processes over the past few months.

Lancashire & South Cumbria: A ‘test and learn’ approach to community-led health and care

This is the case study of Lancashire and South Cumbria Building Health Partnerships (BHP) area. It tells the story of how they worked across sectors in Lancashire and South Cumbria to design a way for statutory services to share leadership with the voluntary and community sector. 

 

The BHP area recognised that the VCFSE sector and Lancashire and South Cumbria ICS (Integrated Care System) needed to work together as equal partners to develop new models of health and care that are centred on preventing, rather than treating, ill health.

 

The work was led by a steering group comprising of the Head of Communications for the Lancashire and South Cumbria ICS team (delivering the shared Healthier Lancashire and South Cumbria vision), representatives from Public Health England, the local authority and leaders from voluntary, community, faith and social enterprise organisations.

 

This work was supported by the Building Health Partnerships Programme delivered by the Institute for Voluntary Action Research and Social Enterprise UK and jointly funded by The National Lottery Community Fund and NHS England and NHS Improvement. Click here for further information and resources.

Nottingham & Nottinghamshire: Reducing delayed transfers of care

This is the case study of the Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Building Health Partnerships (BHP) area. It tells the story of how they worked across sectors in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire to reduce the number of delayed transfers of care from hospital, particularly amongst people aged over 75 with dementia.

In 2017, a review of 24 cases where patients had been discharged from hospital in Nottinghamshire found that 42% could have had an even more independent pathway if opportunities to support this were more available and known about. Doing this would have resulted in a 21% saving for health and social care budgets. The aim of this BHP area was to address this issue, improving patient health and wellbeing, as well as creating a more effective and efficient health and care system that makes the most of all its assets.

The work was led by a steering group comprising of Nottingham Community Voluntary Services (NCVS), Nottingham University Hospitals, Adult Social Care, the  Integrated Care System and Healthwatch Nottingham and Nottinghamshire (HWNN).

This work was supported by the Building Health Partnerships Programme delivered by the Institute for Voluntary Action Research and Social Enterprise UK and jointly funded by The National Lottery Community Fund and NHS England and NHS Improvement. Click here for further information and resources.

North Cumbria: Stroke Prevention

This is the case study of North Cumbria STP a Building Health Partnerships (BHP) area. It tells the story of how they worked across sectors in North Cumbria to prevent people from having strokes through raising awareness of risk factors and offering health screening at community events.

Their aim was to develop an initiative shaped by the community and delivered in partnership with patients – ‘community-led and NHS enabled’ – to explore opportunities for both preventing and raising awareness of stroke. They also wanted to learn how to spread this way of working to other geographic areas and for other health conditions across North Cumbria.

The work was led by a steering group, with representatives of the Rotary club, the West Cumbrians’ Voice for Healthcare, The Stroke Association, North West Ambulance  Service, Healthwatch Cumbria, Public Health, Community Pharmacy Cumbria and the local NHS (North Cumbria Integrated Care System), with active participation from patients with lived experience.

This work was supported by the Building Health Partnerships Programme delivered by the Institute for Voluntary Action Research and Social Enterprise UK and jointly funded by The National Lottery Community Fund and NHS England and NHS Improvement. Click here for further information and resources.

West Yorkshire & Harrogate: Community-led public health

This is the case study of the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Building Health Partnerships (BHP) area. It tells the story of how they worked across sectors in West Yorkshire and Harrogate to prevent sight loss and reduce the chances of young people developing musculoskeletal conditions. 

West Yorkshire and Harrogate ICS have developed a ‘blended intervention’ approach aimed at understanding which clinical interventions or support services could be enhanced by collaboration across the health and voluntary sectors. The BHP area aimed to strengthen existing relationships and involve more community members by building on ‘Harnessing the Power of Communities’, an existing programme that linked VCSEs and healthcare agencies.

The work was led by a steering group comprising representatives of the West Yorkshire and Harrogate ICS, Calderdale and Wakefield CCGs, Wakefield Council Public Health, Voluntary Action Calderdale, Drop the Knife, Visits Unlimited and Active Calderdale, with active participation from the community and young people.

This work was supported by the Building Health Partnerships Programme delivered by the Institute for Voluntary Action Research and Social Enterprise UK and jointly funded by The National Lottery Community Fund and NHS England and NHS Improvement. Click here for further information and resources.